Brazil Regulation Vote Put On Hold Again

Brazil’s gambling legislation has been delayed many times over the last 25 years, and it looks as if 2017 will not be an exception.

Half Year Imminence

A recent Congressional vote rendering Brazilian regulation imminent has already turned into an approximate half year real time wait for licenses to be issued and operations to commence–hopefully.

Corruption Interferes

Gambling legislation only requires one more vote. However, the Brazilian government has more pressing issues to address first, such as the Supreme Court injunction removing Senate President Renan Calheiros from office as a result of his indictment for embezzlement.

Vote to Cancel

A vote of 44 to 19 has cancelled the prospects of a final vote originally for December to choose one of two competing gambling bills – the Senate’s 186/2014 and the Chamber of Deputies’ 442/1991.

Back to Committee

The reroute was announced Tuesday by gambling proponent and Senator Fernando Bezerra Coelho, who informed Radio Jornal de Pernambuco that Bill 186/2014 had been sent to the Committee on Constitution, Justice and Citizenship (CCJ).

Rationale

The reason given for the vote to return PLS 186/2014 to the CCJ House Committee on Constitution, Justice and Citizenship was to continue discussion and research on individual points of the current bill.

Spring Hope

As for a time frame for a final Parliamentary vote, Coelho suggested it might take until “March, April, (to) gather support necessary for the activity of gambling to be legalized in Brazil.”

Moral Argument

In addition to public distrust of corruption, the moral issue came to the forefront when Brazil’s Catholic clergy urged the nation to oppose gambling liberalization in order to prevent “irreparable moral, social and family damage.”

Prospects

With the stigma of corruption and fear of moral decline real, Brazil’s final vote on iGaming legislation could be the longest wait, despite the promise of supporting lawmakers of the much-needed boost regulation offers to Brazil’s struggling economy.

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